Organization

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1. Organization refers to the institution undertaking the BCM or Crisis Management or DR activities unless further qualified.
Understanding the Organization
Managing your Business Continuity Planning Project BUY!


BCMBoK Competency Level
BCMBoK 1: Project Management CL 1B: Foundation (BC)



BCMBoK Competency Level
BCMBoK 1: Project Management CL 1C: Foundation (CM)



BCMBoK Competency Level
BCMBoK 1: Project Management CL 1CC: Foundation (CC)



BCMBoK Competency Level
BCMBoK 1: Project Management CL 1D: Foundation (DR)
A Manager’s Guide to ISO 22301 Standard for Business Continuity Management System' (2014) BUY!







Courses: BCM: Non-certification

Courses: BCM: Certification

(Source: Business Continuity Management Institute - BCM Institute)

2. Person or group of people that has its own functions with responsibilities, authorities and relationships to achieve its objectives.

Notes (1) : The concept of organization includes, but is not limited to, sole-trader, company, corporation, firm, enterprise, authority, partnership, charity or institution, or part or combination thereof, whether incorporated or not, public or private.

Notes (2) : For organizations with more than one operating unit, a single operating unit can be defined as an organization.

(Source: ISO 22301:2012 – Societal Security – Business Continuity Management Systems - Requirements) - clause 3.33

3. Group of people and facilities with an arrangement of responsibilities, authorities and relationships.

(Source: AE/HSC/NCEMA 7000:2012)

4. Group of people and facilities with an arrangement of responsibilities, authorities and relationships.

  • example: Company, corporation, firm, enterprise, institution, charity, sole trader, association, agency or parts or combination thereof.

Notes (1) : The arrangement is generally orderly.

Notes (2) : An organization can be public or private.

Notes (3) : This definition is valid for the purposes of quality management system standards. The term "organization” is defined differently in ISO/IEC Guide 2. ([ISO 9000:2005, definition 3.3.1])

Notes (4) : An organization is a standing group or a temporary one established ad-hoc to perform a specific and limited task such as an incident response organization.

(Source: ISO 22320:2010 - Societal Security - Emergency Management - Requirements for Command and Control) - clause 3.12


5. Group of people and facilities with an arrangement of responsibilities, authorities and relationships.

Notes (1) : An organization can be a government or public entity, company, corporation, firm, enterprise, institution, charity, sole trade or association, or parts or combinations thereof.

(Source: ISO 22399:2007 – Societal Security - Guideline for Incident Preparedness and Operational Continuity Management) - clause 3.26


6. Group of people and facilities with an arrangement of responsibilities, authorities and relationships.

(Source: British Standard BS25999-1:2006 Code of Practice for Business Continuity Management)


7. An enterprise, a corporate entity; a firm, an establishment, a public or government body, department or agency; a business or a charity.

(Source: Business Continuity Institute - BCI)


8. A group of people and facilities with an arrangement of responsibilities,authorities and relationships.

EXAMPLE:Includes company,corporation,firm,enterprise,institution,charity,sole trader,association,or parts or combination thereof.

NOTE 1:The arrangement is generally orderly.

NOTE 2:An organization can be public or private.

NOTE 3:This definition is valid for the purposes of quality management system standards. The term 'organization' is defined differently in ISO/IEC Guide 2.

(AS/NZS ISO 9000)

(Source: HB 221:2004 Business Continuity Management)


9. A company,firm,organization,association,group or other legal entity or part thereof whether incorporated or not,public or private that has its own function(s) and administration.

(Source: Australia. A Practitioner's Guide to Business Continuity Management HB292 - 2006 )