Event

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1. An Event is a pre-announced large-scale activity that would lead to a disaster or crisis. The stakeholders are made aware by a set of announcements or early indicators.
  • Notes (1): These events could potentially cause disruption to businesses due to the closure of premises and access routes, increase security restrictions and inconvenience of customers.
  • Notes (2): Examples of events that will disrupt business are the APEC meetings, the Olympics and the WTO meetings with known dates and duration of events.
  • Notes (3): If the word "Event" is used as Crisis Event, "Event" implies "is a series of occurrences that happen over a period of time"


BCM Institute Business Continuity Management Umbrella

Related Terms: Crisis, Incident, Disaster, Emergency, Disruptive Events

BCMBoK Competency Level
BCMBoK 1: Project Management CL 1B: Foundation (BC)



BCMBoK Competency Level
BCMBoK 1: Project Management CL 1C: Foundation (CM)



BCMBoK Competency Level
BCMBoK 1: Project Management CL 1CC: Foundation (CC)



BCMBoK Competency Level
BCMBoK 1: Project Management CL 1D: Foundation (DR)

(Source: Business Continuity Management Institute - BCM Institute)


2. Occurrence or change of a particular set of circumstances.

Notes (1) : An event can be one or more occurrences, and can have several causes.

Notes (2) : An event can consist of something not happening.

Notes (3) : An event can sometimes be referred to as an "incident" or "accident".

Notes (4) : An event without consequences may also be referred to as a "near miss", "incident", "near hit", "close call".

(Source ISO/IEC Guide 73)

(Source: ISO 22301:2012 – Societal Security – Business Continuity Management Systems - Requirements) - clause 3.17


3. Occurrence or change of a particular set of circumstances.

Notes (1) : The event can be certain or uncertain.

Notes (2) : The event can be a single occurrence or a series of occurrences.

Notes (3) : The probability associated with the event can be estimated for a given period of time.

(Source: ISO 22399:2007 – Societal Security - Guideline for Incident Preparedness and Operational Continuity Management) - clause 3.8

4. Occurrence or change of a particular set of circumstances.

Notes (1) : An event can be one or more occurrences, and can have several causes.

Notes (2) : An event can consist of something not happening.

Notes (3) : An event can sometimes be referred to as an “incident” or “accident”.

Notes (4) : An event without consequences (2.18) can also be referred to as a “near miss”, “incident”, “near hit” or “close call”.

[ISO Guide 73:2009, definition 3.5.1.3]

(Source: ISO 31000:2009 – Risk Management — Principles and Guidelines) - clause 2.17

5. Any occurrence that may lead to a business continuity incident.

(Source: Business Continuity Institute - BCI)

6. Occurrence of a particular set of circumstances.

(Source: Australia. A Practitioner's Guide to Business Continuity Management HB292 - 2006 )

7. Occurrence or change of a particular set of circumstances.

NOTES:

  • Nature, likelihood, and consequence of an event cannot be fully knowable.
  • An event can be one or more occurrences, and can have several causes.
  • Likelihood associated with the event can be determined.
  • An event can consist of a non occurrence of one or more circumstances.
  • An event with a consequence is sometimes referred to as ‘incident’.
  • An event where no loss occurs may also be referred to as a ‘near miss’, ‘near hit’, ‘close call’

or ‘dangerous occurrence’.

(Source: AS/NZS 5050.1 Australian and New Zealand Standards for business continuity management.

Part 1: Business continuity management system specification)

8. Occurrence or change of a particular set of circumstances.

NOTES:

  • Nature, likelihood, and consequence of an event can not be fully knowable.
  • An event can be one or more occurrences, and can have several causes.
  • Likelihood associated with the event can be determined.
  • An event can consist of a non occurrence of one or more circumstances.
  • An event with a consequence is sometimes referred to as ‘incident’.
  • An event where no loss occurs may also be referred to as a ‘near miss’, ‘near hit’, ‘close call’

or ‘dangerous occurrence’.

(Source: AS/NZS 5050.2 Australian and New Zealand Standards for business continuity management.

Part 2: Business continuity management practice standard)

9. Any occurrence that may lead to a Business Continuity incident.

(Source: ENISA - the European Network and Information Security Agency. BCM & Resilience Glossary)