Event

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1. An Event is a pre-announced large-scale activity that would lead to a disaster or crisis. The stakeholders are made aware by a set of announcements or early indicators.


  • Notes (1): These events could potentially cause disruption to businesses due to closure of premises and access routes, increase security restrictions and inconvenience of customers.
  • Notes (2): Examples of events that will disrupt business are the APEC meetings, the Olympics and the WTO meetings with known dates and duration of events.


BCM Institute Business Continuity Management Umbrella

Related Terms: Crisis, Incident, Disaster, Emergency, Disruptive Events

BCMBoK Competency Level
BCMBoK 1: Project Management CL 1B: Foundation (BC)



BCMBoK Competency Level
BCMBoK 1: Project Management CL 1C: Foundation (CM)



BCMBoK Competency Level
BCMBoK 1: Project Management CL 1CC: Foundation (CC)



BCMBoK Competency Level
BCMBoK 1: Project Management CL 1D: Foundation (DR)

(Source: Business Continuity Management Institute - BCM Institute)


2. Occurrence or change of a particular set of circumstances.

Notes (1) : An event can be one or more occurrences, and can have several causes.

Notes (2) : An event can consist of something not happening.

Notes (3) : An event can sometimes be referred to as an "incident" or "accident".

Notes (4) : An event without consequences may also be referred to as a "near miss", "incident", "near hit", "close call".

(Source ISO/IEC Guide 73)

(Source: ISO 22301:2012 – Societal Security – Business Continuity Management Systems - Requirements) - clause 3.17


3. Occurrence or change of a particular set of circumstances.

Notes (1) : The event can be certain or uncertain.

Notes (2) : The event can be a single occurrence or a series of occurrences.

Notes (3) : The probability associated with the event can be estimated for a given period of time.

(Source: ISO 22399:2007 – Societal Security - Guideline for Incident Preparedness and Operational Continuity Management) - clause 3.8

4. Occurrence or change of a particular set of circumstances.

Notes (1) : An event can be one or more occurrences, and can have several causes.

Notes (2) : An event can consist of something not happening.

Notes (3) : An event can sometimes be referred to as an “incident” or “accident”.

Notes (4) : An event without consequences (2.18) can also be referred to as a “near miss”, “incident”, “near hit” or “close call”.

[ISO Guide 73:2009, definition 3.5.1.3]

(Source: ISO 31000:2009 – Risk Management — Principles and Guidelines) - clause 2.17

5. Any occurrence that may lead to a business continuity incident.

(Source: Business Continuity Institute - BCI)

6. Occurrence of a particular set of circumstances.

(Source: Australia. A Practitioner's Guide to Business Continuity Management HB292 - 2006 )

7. Occurrence or change of a particular set of circumstances.

NOTES:

  • Nature, likelihood, and consequence of an event cannot be fully knowable.
  • An event can be one or more occurrences, and can have several causes.
  • Likelihood associated with the event can be determined.
  • An event can consist of a non occurrence of one or more circumstances.
  • An event with a consequence is sometimes referred to as ‘incident’.
  • An event where no loss occurs may also be referred to as a ‘near miss’, ‘near hit’, ‘close call’

or ‘dangerous occurrence’.

(Source: AS/NZS 5050.1 Australian and New Zealand Standards for business continuity management.

Part 1: Business continuity management system specification)

8. Occurrence or change of a particular set of circumstances.

NOTES:

  • Nature, likelihood, and consequence of an event can not be fully knowable.
  • An event can be one or more occurrences, and can have several causes.
  • Likelihood associated with the event can be determined.
  • An event can consist of a non occurrence of one or more circumstances.
  • An event with a consequence is sometimes referred to as ‘incident’.
  • An event where no loss occurs may also be referred to as a ‘near miss’, ‘near hit’, ‘close call’

or ‘dangerous occurrence’.

(Source: AS/NZS 5050.2 Australian and New Zealand Standards for business continuity management.

Part 2: Business continuity management practice standard)

9. Any occurrence that may lead to a Business Continuity incident.

(Source: ENISA - the European Network and Information Security Agency. BCM & Resilience Glossary)